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Animation and interactivity facilitate acquisition of pediatric life support skills: a randomized controlled trial using virtual patients versus video instruction

Lehmann, Ronny ; Lutz, Thomas ; Helling-Bakki, Astrid ; Kummer, Sebastian ; Huwendiek, Sören ; Bosse, Hans Martin

In: BMC Medical Education, 19 (2019), Nr. 7. pp. 1-9. ISSN 1472-6920

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Download (1MB) | Lizenz: Creative Commons LizenzvertragAnimation and interactivity facilitate acquisition of pediatric life support skills: a randomized controlled trial using virtual patients versus video instruction by Lehmann, Ronny ; Lutz, Thomas ; Helling-Bakki, Astrid ; Kummer, Sebastian ; Huwendiek, Sören ; Bosse, Hans Martin underlies the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

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Abstract

Background: Several promising studies suggest a positive impact of interactive and media-enriched e-learning resources such as virtual patients (VP) on skill acquisition in pediatric basic life support (PBLS). This study investigates which immanent VP components account for this effect.

Methods: N = 103 medical students in their 5th year were assigned to one of three groups: a video group prepared with self-instructional videos on PBLS (N = 37); an animation-enriched VP group with VP containing interactive questions (N = 35), static and animated media, and a static VP group with VP containing interactive questions and only static media (N = 31). Subsequent PBLS demonstrations were video-documented and scored for adherence to guideline-based algorithm, temporal demands (such as correct pace of rescue breaths and chest compressions), and quality of procedural steps (e.g., correct head positioning), as well as overall competency by two group-blinded, independent pediatricians.

Results: Groups did not differ with regard to adherence to correct algorithm (88.7 ± 10.3, 93.3 ± 6.7 and 90.3 ± 10.5, respectively). Self-instruction with animated media – through videos or animation-enriched VP – resulted in a better adherence to temporal demands, as compared with training with static VP (64.5 ± 26.3 and 50.7 ± 25.7, respectively, vs. 23.8 ± 21.0). Procedural quality by the video group was slightly inferior compared with the animation-enriched VP group (79.5 ± 12.3 vs. 82.0 ± 11.9), and distinct inferior in overall ‘competent’ ratings (43.2% vs. 65.7%). The static VP group performed considerably most poorly of all three groups (temporal adherence 73.2 ± 11.9 and 19.4% ‘competent’ ratings).

Conclusions: VP can feasibly enhance PBLS skill acquisition. Thoughtful design of animations and interactivity of the VP further improves such skill acquisition, both in quality of performance and in adherence to temporal demands.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Medical Education
Volume: 19
Number: 7
Publisher: BioMed Central
Place of Publication: London
Date Deposited: 10 Jan 2019 10:08
Date: 2019
ISSN: 1472-6920
Page Range: pp. 1-9
Faculties / Institutes: Medizinische Fakultät Heidelberg > Universitätskinderklinik
Subjects: 610 Medical sciences Medicine
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