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Socioeconomic decline and advancement within and between generations and the risk of stroke - a case-control study

Grau, Armin J. ; Aigner, Annette ; Urbanek, Christian ; Palm, Frederik ; Buggle, Florian ; Safer, Anton ; Becher, Heiko

In: Neurological Research and Practice, 1 (2019), Nr. 8. pp. 1-6. ISSN 2524-3489

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Download (772kB) | Lizenz: Creative Commons LizenzvertragSocioeconomic decline and advancement within and between generations and the risk of stroke - a case-control study by Grau, Armin J. ; Aigner, Annette ; Urbanek, Christian ; Palm, Frederik ; Buggle, Florian ; Safer, Anton ; Becher, Heiko underlies the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

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Abstract

Background: Disadvantageous socioeconomic conditions (SEC) in both childhood and adulthood increase the risk of stroke. We investigated whether intergenerational and lifetime social advancement decreases and/or social descent increases stroke risk.

Methods: In a case-control study with 466 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke and 807 controls randomly selected from the general population, we compared paternal profession to subjects’ professional education in adolescence and their last profession in adulthood. Furthermore, we constructed a socioeconomic risk score for childhood (based on paternal and maternal profession and occupation, familial, living and material conditions), adolescence (based on highest school degree and professional education), and adulthood (based on last profession, periods of unemployment, and marital status), and compared subjects´ positions at different life stages. Odds ratios were derived based on conditional logistic regression conditioning on age and sex only, after adjustment for medical and lifestyle risk factors, and after additional adjustment for socioeconomic risk score values.

Results: Intergenerational upward mobility between paternal profession and subject’s professional education was associated with lower ischemic stroke risk independent of medical and lifestyle risk factors (odds ratio (OR) 0.58; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41–0.81) and after additional adjustment for socioeconomic conditions in all three life stages (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.45–0.99). Advancement between fathers´ profession and subject’s last profession was associated with reduced odds of stroke after adjustment for risk factors (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.47–0.89), but not significantly after additional adjustment for SEC (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.52–1.13). Social descent between adolescence and adulthood indicated by the transition into a more disadvantageous tertile of socioeconomic risk score was associated with increased odds of stroke after adjustment for all risk factor (OR 2.93; 95% CI 1.21–7.13). Analyses by sex revealed mostly similar results in men and women with only few potential differences.

Conclusions: Our study results indicate that aspects of social downward mobility during adulthood may be associated with increased risk of stroke, whereas intergenerational upward mobility may be linked to a lower stroke risk. If confirmed by future studies, such results may help to focus stroke prevention measures at high risk populations.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Neurological Research and Practice
Volume: 1
Number: 8
Publisher: BioMed Central
Place of Publication: London
Date Deposited: 22 May 2019 15:08
Date: 2019
ISSN: 2524-3489
Page Range: pp. 1-6
Faculties / Institutes: Medizinische Fakultät Heidelberg > Institut für Public Health (IPH)
Subjects: 610 Medical sciences Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords: Socioeconomic conditions, Risk factor, Ischemic stroke
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