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Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis against malaria mosquitoes in northwestern Burkina Faso

Dambach, Peter ; Louis, Valérie R. ; Kaiser, Achim ; Ouedraogo, Saidou ; Sié, Ali ; Sauerborn, Rainer ; Becker, Norbert

In: Parasites & Vectors, 7 (2014), Nr. 371. pp. 1-8. ISSN 1756-3305

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Download (1MB) | Lizenz: Creative Commons LizenzvertragEfficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis against malaria mosquitoes in northwestern Burkina Faso by Dambach, Peter ; Louis, Valérie R. ; Kaiser, Achim ; Ouedraogo, Saidou ; Sié, Ali ; Sauerborn, Rainer ; Becker, Norbert underlies the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Germany

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Abstract

Background: In Sub Saharan Africa malaria remains one of the major health problems and its control represents an important public health measure. Integrated malaria control comprises the use of impregnated mosquito nets and indoor residual spraying. The use of drugs to treat patients can create additional pressure on the equation of malaria transmission. Vector control may target the adult mosquitoes or their aquatic larval stages. Biological larvicides such as Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) represent a promising approach to support malaria control programs by creating additional pressure on the equation of malaria transmission. Methods: In this study we examined the efficacy of a water-dispersible granule formulation (WDG) of the biological larvicide Bti (VectoBac®) against wild Anopheles spp. larvae. Different concentrations of the larvicide were tested in standardized plastic tubs in the field against untreated controls. In weekly intervals tubs were treated with fixed concentrations of larvicide and the percentage reduction of larvae and pupae was calculated. Results: All used concentrations successfully killed 100 percent of the larvae within 24 hours, while the higher concentrations showed a slightly prolonged residual effect. Natural reconolization of larvae took place after two and three days respectively, late instar larvae were not found before 5 days after treatment. For the higher concentrations, up to three days no new larvae were found, implicating that the residual effect of WDG in tropical conditions is approximately one to two days. The overall pupae reduction in treated tubs was 98.5%. Conclusions: Biological larviciding with Bti can be a promising, additional tool in the fight against malaria in Africa. Environmental particularities in tropical Africa, first and foremost the rapid development of mosquitoes from oviposition to imago have to be taken into account before implementing such counter measures in national or international vector control programs. Nonetheless biological larviciding seems to be an appropriate measure for selected conditions, offering a significant contribution to the future of malaria control.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Parasites & Vectors
Volume: 7
Number: 371
Publisher: BioMed Central
Place of Publication: London
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2016 13:55
Date: 2014
ISSN: 1756-3305
Page Range: pp. 1-8
Faculties / Institutes: Service facilities > Centre for Organismal Studies Heidelberg (COS)
Medizinische Fakultät Heidelberg > Institut für Public Health (IPH)
Subjects: 610 Medical sciences Medicine
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