Directly to content
  1. Publishing |
  2. Search |
  3. Browse |
  4. Recent items rss |
  5. Open Access |
  6. Jur. Issues |
  7. DeutschClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Optimization of carbon ion and proton treatment plans using the raster-scanning technique for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer

Dreher, Constantin ; Habermehl, Daniel ; Ecker, Swantje ; Brons, Stephan ; El-Shafie, Rami ; Jäkel, Oliver ; Debus, Jürgen ; Combs, Stephanie E.

In: Radiation Oncology, 10 (2015), Nr. 237. pp. 1-9. ISSN 1748-717X

[img]
Preview
PDF, English
Download (2MB) | Lizenz: Creative Commons LizenzvertragOptimization of carbon ion and proton treatment plans using the raster-scanning technique for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer by Dreher, Constantin ; Habermehl, Daniel ; Ecker, Swantje ; Brons, Stephan ; El-Shafie, Rami ; Jäkel, Oliver ; Debus, Jürgen ; Combs, Stephanie E. underlies the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Germany

Citation of documents: Please do not cite the URL that is displayed in your browser location input, instead use the DOI, URN or the persistent URL below, as we can guarantee their long-time accessibility.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the thesis is to improve radiation plans of patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer by using carbon ion and proton beams. Patients and methods: Using the treatment planning system Syngo RT Planning (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) a total of 50 treatment plans have been created for five patients with the dose schedule 15 × 3 Gy(RBE). With reference to the anatomy, five field configurations were considered to be relevant. The plans were analyzed with respect to dose distribution and individual anatomy, and compared using a customized index. Results: Within the index the three-field configurations yielded the best results, though with a high variety of score points (field setup 5, carbon ion: median 74 (range 48–101)). The maximum dose in the myelon is low (e.g. case 3, carbon ion: 21.5 Gy(RBE)). A single posterior field generally spares the organs at risk, but the maximum dose in the myelon is high (e.g. case 3, carbon ion: 32.9 Gy(RBE)). Two oblique posterior fields resulted in acceptable maximum doses in the myelon (e.g. case 3, carbon ion: 26.9 Gy(RBE)). The single-field configuration and the two oblique posterior fields had a small score dispersion (carbon ion: median 66 and 58 (range 62–72 and 40–69)). In cases with topographic proximity of the organs at risk to the target volume, the single-field configuration scored as well as the three-field configurations. Conclusion: In summary, the three-field configurations showed the best dose distributions. A single posterior field seems to be robust and beneficial in case of difficult topographical conditions and topographical proximity of organs at risk to the target volume. A setup with two oblique posterior fields is a reasonable compromise between three-field and single-field configurations.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Radiation Oncology
Volume: 10
Number: 237
Publisher: BioMed Central
Place of Publication: London
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2016 13:20
Date: 2015
ISSN: 1748-717X
Page Range: pp. 1-9
Faculties / Institutes: Service facilities > German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)
Medizinische Fakultät Heidelberg > Radiologische Universitätsklinik
Medizinische Fakultät Heidelberg > Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT)
Subjects: 610 Medical sciences Medicine
About | FAQ | Contact | Imprint |
OA-LogoDINI certificate 2013Logo der Open-Archives-Initiative