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How much does community-based targeting of the ultra-poor in the health sector cost? Novel evidence from Burkina Faso

Beaugé, Yvonne ; Koulidiati, Jean-Louis ; Ridde, Valéry ; Robyn, Paul Jacob ; De Allegri, Manuela

In: Health Economics Review, 8 (2018), Nr. 19. pp. 1-11. ISSN 2191-1991

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Download (1MB) | Lizenz: Creative Commons LizenzvertragHow much does community-based targeting of the ultra-poor in the health sector cost? Novel evidence from Burkina Faso by Beaugé, Yvonne ; Koulidiati, Jean-Louis ; Ridde, Valéry ; Robyn, Paul Jacob ; De Allegri, Manuela underlies the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Germany

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Abstract

Background: Targeting efforts aimed at increasing access to care for the poorest by reducing to a minimum or completely eliminating payments at point of use are increasingly being adopted across low and middle income countries, within the framework of Universal Health Coverage policies. No evidence, however, is available on the real cost of designing and implementing these efforts. Our study aimed to fill this gap in knowledge through the systematic assessment of both the financial and economic costs associated with designing and implementing a pro-poor community-based targeting intervention across eight districts in rural Burkina Faso.

Methods: We conducted a partial retrospective economic evaluation (i.e. estimating costs, but not benefits) associated with the abovementioned targeting intervention. We adopted a health system perspective, including all costs incurred by the government and its development partners as well as costs incurred by the community when working as volunteers on behalf of government structures. To trace both financial and economic costs, we combined Activity-Based Costing with Resource Consumption Accounting. To this purpose, we consulted and extracted information from all relevant design/implementation documents and conducted additional key informant structured interviews to assess the resource consumption that was not valued in the documents.

Results: For the entire community-based targeting intervention, we estimated a financial cost of USD 587,510 and an economic cost of USD 1,213,447. The difference was driven primarily by the value of the time contributed by the community. Communities carried the main economic burden. With a total of 102,609 ultra-poor identified, the financial cost and the economic cost per ultra-poor person were respectively USD 5,73 and USD 11,83.

Conclusion: The study is first of its kind to accurately trace the financial and economic costs of a community-based targeting intervention aiming to identify the ultra-poor. The financial costs amounted to USD 5,73 and the economic costs to USD 11,83 per ultra-poor person identified. The financial costs of almost USD 6 represents 21% of the per capita government expenditure on health.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Health Economics Review
Volume: 8
Number: 19
Publisher: Springer
Place of Publication: Heidelberg
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2018 12:42
Date: 2018
ISSN: 2191-1991
Page Range: pp. 1-11
Faculties / Institutes: Medizinische Fakultät Heidelberg > Institut für Public Health (IPH)
Subjects: 610 Medical sciences Medicine
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