Directly to content
  1. Publishing |
  2. Search |
  3. Browse |
  4. Recent items rss |
  5. Open Access |
  6. Jur. Issues |
  7. DeutschClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Sex-specific changes in gene expression in response to estrogen pollution around the onset of sex differentiation in grayling (Salmonidae)

Selmoni, Oliver M. ; Maitre, Diane ; Roux, Julien ; Wilkins, Laetitia G. E. ; Marques da Cunha, Lucas ; Vermeirssen, Etienne L. M. ; Knörr, Susanne ; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc ; Wedekind, Claus

In: BMC Genomics, 20 (2019), Nr. 583. pp. 1-12. ISSN 1471-2164

[img] PDF, English - main document
Download (833kB) | Lizenz: Creative Commons LizenzvertragSex-specific changes in gene expression in response to estrogen pollution around the onset of sex differentiation in grayling (Salmonidae) by Selmoni, Oliver M. ; Maitre, Diane ; Roux, Julien ; Wilkins, Laetitia G. E. ; Marques da Cunha, Lucas ; Vermeirssen, Etienne L. M. ; Knörr, Susanne ; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc ; Wedekind, Claus underlies the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

Citation of documents: Please do not cite the URL that is displayed in your browser location input, instead use the DOI, URN or the persistent URL below, as we can guarantee their long-time accessibility.

Abstract

The synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a common estrogenic pollutant that has been suspected to affect the demography of river-dwelling salmonids. One possibility is that exposure to EE2 tips the balance during initial steps of sex differentiation, so that male genotypes show female-specific gene expression and gonad formation. Here we study EE2 effects on gene expression around the onset of sex differentiation in a population of European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) that suffers from sex ratio distortions. We exposed singly-raised embryos to one dose of 1 ng/L EE2, studied gene expression 10 days before hatching, at the day of hatching, and around the end of the yolk-sac stage, and related it to genetic sex (sdY genotype). We found that exposure to EE2 affects expression of a large number of genes, especially around hatching. These effects were strongly sex-dependent. We then raised fish for several months after hatching and found no evidence of sex reversal in the EE2-exposed fish. We conclude that ecologically relevant (i.e. low) levels of EE2 pollution do not cause sex reversal by simply tipping the balance at early stages of sex differentiation, but that they interfere with sex-specific gene expression.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Genomics
Volume: 20
Number: 583
Publisher: BioMed Central ; Springer
Place of Publication: London ; Berlin, Heidelberg
Date Deposited: 14 Aug 2019 10:34
Date: 2019
ISSN: 1471-2164
Page Range: pp. 1-12
Faculties / Institutes: Service facilities > Centre for Organismal Studies Heidelberg (COS)
Subjects: 570 Life sciences
610 Medical sciences Medicine
About | FAQ | Contact | Imprint |
OA-LogoDINI certificate 2013Logo der Open-Archives-Initiative